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Wildlife

Burdock Root Nourishes Brain and Body Organs

By Simeon Darwick
Nutritional Health Coach
05/22/13

Burdock is used in traditional medicine to treat more than a dozen illnesses. Historically, the seeds of the burdock plants were compressed to make a mixture that was effective in cleansing the bloodstream, soothing aching joints and easing pain from arthritis, treating gout, rheumatism, ulcers, acne, eczema, and psoriasis. Traditional Chinese healers used burdock root in combination with other plants to make cures for colds, measles, sore throat, and tonsillitis. Burdock is also a powerful diuretic to increase urination and also a mild laxative.

In modern times, burdock is also used in oncology, the branch of medicine that treats tumors and cancer. Its cancer-curing properties were also utilized in Russia and India. However, more studies are needed to verify this claim.

Burdock grows in the cooler temperatures in the Central Valley closer to San Jose and can be found at the organic market in Nosara as well as in supplements available at macrobiotic stores. . The root is sweet to the taste and has a gummy consistency. It can be taken orally or used topically as a remedy for skin disorders.

Some of Burdock’s active ingredients are calcium, flavonoids, iron, and potassium. The seeds of the plant contain beneficial fatty acids good for the functioning of the brain and cell communication. The oil from the seeds can be used to increase perspiration, which is great for cleansing the body of toxins like dust, fumes, pesticides, and other chemicals present to the environment and food sources. 

Burdock root is safe to eat, but some reports have indicated that burdock could have toxic properties if it is contaminated. In other words, it’s important to verify it’s organically grown, know the company if you are buying it as a supplement, and if you are getting it fresh take an extra minute to make sure it looks and smells good.

It is eaten as a vegetable in many places. You can cut it into strips just like carrots or cabbage and sauté alone or with other veggies, slice it thinly and put it in a salad, add it to a smoothie, juice, or soup, or drink it as a tea. The water will turn green due to its high content of chlorophyll. Chlorophyll is like liquid light. It is this green that nourishes the heart via cleaning the blood. In short, burdock enhances the performance of many of the organs which purify the body and eliminate toxins or waste (like the kidneys, liver, colon, etc). This enhances overall health and helps correct disorders.

 

 

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